meditation

Ruminatio

Today many people are incapable of living intensely in the present, of feeling what they experience. The old monks developed a method of living completely in the present...a method of meditation they called ruminatio...to chew over. So they took words from scripture into their mouth and kept chewing them over. They repeated them in their hearts, considered and reconsidered them, looked at the word from all sides. The word became flesh in them. It changed them. It gave them something to hold onto in their spiritual unrest and the noisy world. It enabled them to live completely for the moment.

~ from ANGELS OF GRACE by Anselm Gruen

Firs through a quarter-mile mist

firs through a quarter-mile mist
as if bliss is all that stands
between us

 

~ William Michaelian
One Hand Clapping
By William Michaelian

Meet everything through stillness instead of mental noise

To meet everything and everyone through stillness instead of mental noise is the greatest gift you can offer to the universe.

~ from STILLNESS SPEAKS by Eckhart Tolle
Stillness Speaks
By Eckhart Tolle

Meditate deeply

Meditate deeply ... reach the depths of the source. Branching streams cannot compare to this source! Sitting alone in a great silence, even though the heavens turn and the earth is upset, you will not even wink.

~ Nyogen Senzaki, as quoted in 365 PRESCRIPTIONS FOR THE SOUL by Dr. Bernie S. Siegel

May 2015 (Vol. XXVIII, No. 5)

Dear Friends, In the frenzy of life how do we learn to calm our minds and hearts long enough to embrace silence and open ourselves to encounters of the Spirit? We may think of meditation in relation to a particular religion or spiritual path. But it seems to me that we have much to learn when we embark on a practice of meditation regardless of the nature of our beliefs. We are all seekers of wisdom who long for the touch of the Sacred in our lives. Whether meditation is a gateway into centering prayer or a balm for healing or a threshold into Mystery, it is perhaps worth exploring as part of our unfolding spirituality.

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November 1999 (Vol. XII, No. 10)

May the BLESSINGS OF PEACE AND SERENITY be yours in times of silence, prayer, and meditation, dear friends: pauses where we come to know ourselves, others, the osmos, the Heart of all hearts as One inter-related Whole: unity in diversity.

Meditation is a fasting of the heart

MEDITATION does not itself accomplish the tasks of life but provides spaciousness, bringing the great background near, so that whatever we do, rising in the quiet, has force and beauty. In meditation, we take time, sit down, watch, while the silence accumulates -- which is how the spirit gathers to a vessel the soul has prepared ... then, spiritual silence can appear in the midst of any concentrated activity. Meditation is a fasting of the heart in which, for a time, we do not go with our wanting and fear. We cease to attach so strongly to the things of our lives. When the heart fasts and we don't pursue the world, the world begins to come to us.

~ from THE LIGHT INSIDE THE DARK by John Tarrant

The silent mind

The silent mind, cultivated in many different forms of meditation, is the matrix of intuition. When you are in touch with the stillpoint at the center of your being there is no need to use imagery or verbal exercises to activate intuition. It flows by itself, unimpeded by fears or preoccupations.

~ from AWAKENING INTUITION by Frances Vaughan
Awakening Intuition
By Frances E. Vaughan

Meditation makes more sense to the broken or humbled parts of us

From the brokenness of our humanity we can learn the healing and transcendent wisdom of self-acceptance and the non-judgmental acceptance of others. Meditation makes more sense to the broken or humbled parts of us than to the well-defended, successful or public poses that form the more assertive parts of our identity. Simple and pure awareness, without judgment or evaluation, such as we practice in meditation, is always compassionate.

~ from WEB OF SILENCE by Laurence Freeman

Awakening to the Sacred in the world of everyday

The modality of my prayer has changed radically. In place of discursive meditation, I have begun the practice of sitting in silence, making myself a capacity for an outpouring of God's love. ... It is my experience that our awakening to the Sacred in the world of everyday is fed and nurtured by our silent journey to that "space" within where all things are ONE.

~ Moira Toomey Putnam
The Girl from Ballyneety
By Moira Toomey Putnam
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