365 TAO

There is no effort that we can make to still ourselves

There is no effort that we can make to still ourselves. True stillness comes naturally from moments of solitude where we allow our minds to settle. Just as water seeks its own level, the mind will gravitate toward the holy. Muddy water will become clear if allowed to stand undisturbed, and so too will the mind become clear if it is allowed to be still.

~ from 365 TAO: DAILY MEDITATIONS by Deng Ming-Dao
365 Tao: Daily Meditations
By Ming-Dao Deng

Knowing God is the source of compassion in our lives

Knowing God is the source of compassion in our lives. We realize that our separation from others is artificial. We are neither separate from other people nor from Tao. It is only our own egotism that leads us to define ourselves as individuals. In fact, a direct experience of God is a direct experience of the utter universality of life. If we allow it to change our way of thinking, we will understand our essential oneness with all things.

~ from 365 TAO, no. 105
365 Tao: Daily Meditations
By Ming-Dao Deng

The peace that seems to elude so many

As one progresses on the path, one seeks silence more and more. It will be a great comfort, a tremendous source of solace and peace . . . Here finally is the place where you need neither defense nor offense -- the place where you can truly be open. There will be bliss, wonder, the awe of attaining something pure and sacred . . . This is the peace that seems to elude so many.

~ from 365 TAO by Deng Ming-Dao
365 Tao: Daily Meditations
By Ming-Dao Deng

If we still ourselves, we can mirror the divine

If we still ourselves, we can mirror the divine. But if we engage solely in the frenetic activities of our daily involvements, if we seek to impose our own schemes on the natural order, and if we allow ourselves to become turbulent ... There is no effort that we can make to still ourselves. True stillness comes naturally from moments of solitude where we allow our minds to settle. Just as water seeks its own level, the mind with gravitate toward the holy. Muddy water will become clear if allowed to stand undisturbed, and so too will the mind become clear if it is allowed to be still.

~ from 365 Tao by Deng Ming-Dao with thanks to Anne Strader
365 Tao: Daily Meditations
By Ming-Dao Deng

Chanting as a prelude to silence

In a cave, all outer sounds are smothered by rock and earth, but this makes the sounds of one's own heartbeat and breath audible. In the same way, contemplative stillness turns us away from everyday clamor but allows us to hear the subtle in our own lives. When listening not with the ear but with the spirit, one can perceive the subtle sound. By entering into that sound, we enter into supreme purity. That is why so many religious traditions pray, sing, or chant as a prelude to silence. They understand that the repetition and absorption of sound leads to sacredness itself. The deepest sound is silence. This may seem paradoxical only if we regard silence as an absence of life and its opposites. It is both sound and soundlessness, and it is in this confluence that the power of meditation emerges.

~ from 365 TAO by Deng Ming-Dao with thanks to Anne Strader
365 Tao: Daily Meditations
By Ming-Dao Deng
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